June 1, 2012

Citing Sources: A Quick and Graphic Guide

~ ~ Don't forget to check out the other posts in Stacked's "Unconventional Blog Tour"! ~ ~

Academia has lots and lots and lots of systems in place for assuring that credit is always given where credit is due. If you're writing a paper, there are particular ways to cite internet sources-- even tweets and Facebook posts.

But what about on the internet? We know we're supposed to cite sources, but a standardized system hasn't developed, and in the meantime, you could face a lawsuit if you steal someone else's work, even by accident.

Does that mean you can't ever elaborate on someone else's ideas or repeat a little of what someone else said? Of course not. Just use some common sense and always err on the side of caution.

*click to expand




As always, a couple of notes:

- Because of space/design limitations, I didn't include an important guideline: Never repost someone's article in its entirety. If you find yourself quoting more than a paragraph of a long post, or a few lines of a short one, contact the author for their preferences. When in doubt: less is more. (By the way, this also goes for infographics. Copying a whole post full of charts with a tiny link to the source at the end is uncool.)

- Remember that in addition to credits, citations are there to help others track down information they need. My English professor BFF suggested that links are like page numbers in academic citations. Taking two extra minutes to include them might save someone hours of searching, not to mention the help it will be if you need to retrace your steps someday.

- Media and academic sites have their own in-house rules, and so should you. Check out some examples, and consider whether yours fit within the general guidelines required of university studentsSet a good example, and consider explaining your policy so that others will consider their own.

- I realize the hilarity of creating this infographic using pictures to which I don't own the copyright. I've used public domain images whenever possible, but sometimes it's hard to determine the real "owner" of an image, or whether it was a publicly-released promo photos, or whether it's a maniuplation and if so, who owns *that* incarnation...

It's a slippery subject, but in general, the reason the internet has images at all is because of "fair use." If I were making a profit on this project, JKR and Warner Brothers would sue the pants of me, but they *probably* won't because this is an educational project producing no profit and not causing them harm.

However. If I pretended to own them, or that JKR was behind this project, then goodbye pants, hello courtroom.

- Finally, if you're wondering what my qualifications are, I have a BA in History and Spanish and a smattering of grad classes. But I'm not trying to present myself as the ultimate authority on this topic (and feel free to make suggestions or corrections in the comments). In the end, no matter what your schooling, you should be fine if you just follow Wil Wheaton's law: Don't be a ... um, jerk.



Head over to Stacked for more posts about blogging ethics and best practices!


ETA: If you'd like to print this infographic for PERSONAL USE ONLY (this includes librarians-- I mean just don't sell it), you can download and print this PDF version, which is higher res than the jpeg above.

ETA Again: Please read Roni Loren's experience with the fair use defense. (I would still argue this post is a tranformative work.)

Credits:
- Most of the character pictures: Harry Potter wiki.
- Free hugs
- Dementor costume
- Hot Neville
- Weasley is our king
- Hermione
- Moody
- JKR quote
- Ford Anglia
- paper background
- fonts: Academy Engraved LET; Century Schoolbook; Arial 

Dear JKR, I think Hermione would be on board with this project. Please don't sue the pants off me.









41 comments:

  1. This is such a great guide, Kate. Thank you so much for covering it and covering it in an extremely approachable way!

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  2. 1) Best infographic ever.
    2) "Goodbye pants, hello courtroom" should be a law school seminar.
    3) Excellent information. Citing information is crucial for all the reasons mentioned above. Plus, I think proper citation and linkage is great because it fosters a sense of community. If I want to quote someone from this article and link back, I feel like I'm taking part in the conversation. Without mentioning that you posted it first, I'm stopping the conversation. Citing sources isn't just good for your intellectual and moral conscious; it brings people together. Hugs all around!

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  3. This infographic is strangely similar to my high school's "Guide to Writing a Research Paper." Only more interesting, of course. They should steal this (err, I mean, re-post this with quotes and a link to the original image source) instead.

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  4. They don't like it when you show up in court without pants. Don't...don't ask me how I know that.

    So, would it be cool to (hypothetically) plaster this on Facebook, since the credits are right there in the image?

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  5. Oh, I am SO using this with my 7th and 8th graders! Thanks for the great resouce (which I will properly credit)!

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  6. This is brilliant! I love it!

    I'm a teen services librarian, and would love to share this with my teens. It would be the perfect thing to put on the teen bulletin board in a couple months for "back to school" time. May I post it in my library? You've so nicely included credit information at the bottom of the image... is there any further information you would like me to include if I have your permission to post it?

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    Replies
    1. No, go right ahead! I'm glad it'll be helpful!

      Delete
  7. This is brilliant! May I have your permission to re-post it? so I may not be tagged as "plagiarist" :D

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  8. v. cute, but is "Siriusly" a misspelling, or an allusion that I am missing?

    Also you should put a Creative Commons copyright on it. That way you won't have to respond to every single request to use it.

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    Replies
    1. It's an allusion to Sirius Black, the character pictured.

      Thanks for the suggestion. :)

      Delete
  9. I LOVE this! And it's so timely--we are working on plagiarism right now and we're starting our blogs this week. Thanks!

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  10. Well....I have struggled to explain this to my students and now won't have to next week. Whenever possible cite the orignal source, right? So Indiana U gets the nod for this one :-)

    Thank you so much.
    Ian

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  11. Kate, there is an error. The last one, bottom right-hand entry...there is no in-text citation or page number provided...so, it's still not complete. are you able tocorrect it?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Richard,
      Not an error-- the highlighted author name indicates a hyperlink. The chart was aimed at bloggers citing other bloggers, not so much students citing academic sources.

      Thanks!

      Delete
  12. I am a college librarian and really like the "Magical Guide". Would you please give me permission to copy this and put it in our online library orientation? I would of course reference it to you.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Jan - Yes, you're welcome to use it!

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    2. Thank you Kate. Much as I love the images you have used and they would undoubtedly appeal to studenst, I am a little worried about copyright. Would you be so kind as to give me remixing priveledges so I could replace them with different images?

      Delete
  13. This is awesome! I am in library school, I am going to link to this article on my blog. Every teacher librarian in the world should see this infographic.

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  14. Hi Kate;
    Great Guide. I´ve published it at
    http://officinadamente.com.br/blog/wp-admin/post.php?action=edit&post=2551
    with full and explicit recognition at the begining of the post. If you think it is unfair, please let me know by letting a comment at the blog. I will unpublish it at once.
    Thanks a lot.
    Mauricio Peixoto

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  15. May I post this in my classroom without tampering with the credits you have at the bottom? This is fantastic! I am having real difficulty with my students understanding plagiarism and this is just fantastic!

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  16. May I post this on a Library Guide? The citation to this blog appears before the infographic and there's a link to the blog from the title. The infographic is presented in smaller form so that students must click on it to read it. Please check it out here: http://libguides.uwc.edu/content.php?pid=256536&sid=3312056

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Now I can add, "Used with permission," which I love to include!

      Delete
  17. I want to use this in my classroom, but it states that the file is too large to download with a security scan. Is it possible to download it another way, safely? I have had some nasty viruses in the past and am always wary.

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    Replies
    1. Becca, I could email it to you, but I'm guessing it would still be too big. I don't know anything safer than via Google Docs, I'm sorry!

      Delete
  18. The bit about Hermione is so perfect. :-)

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  19. It wouldn't be JK Rowling who owns the images, it is Time-Warner--and they DO like to sue the pants off people!
    Did you ask their permission?

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    Replies
    1. Based on the four factor fair use test, I think it qualifies as a transformative work. UT has a good explanation.

      Delete
  20. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  21. May we post this in our high school classrooms? It is a busy time of year for students writing last minute papers. Your poster will be a good reminder.

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    Replies
    1. Sure! Just see all the disclaimers above. :)

      Delete
  22. Can I purchase this poster??

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    Replies
    1. Sorry, it's not available for sale. You can download it for personal use.

      Delete
  23. Kate,
    This is a wonderful resource! Harry Potter is a prerequisite for my 10th Grade World Literature course--may I have your permission to use this on my Edmodo site for student references?
    Thank you for sharing this!
    Amanda

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  24. Kate,
    Can I please print this and post it in my library? I would of course keep your information at the bottom. I think this might help my students a lot! Thank you!

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