March 21, 2012

YA Deals 2011-2012, Part III

Last day! Part one covered deals by the money; part two covered deals by the size, and today, we're looking at trends-- but first, I forgot to include these two charts in the financial post. They're pretty self-explanatory.






So trends! Well...




Paranormal is definitely moving away from vampires and werewolves. The only vampire deal I saw was for an existing series, and I only saw two werewolf and two angel blurbs, of which one each was new.

There were several folklore tales, a few ghosts and demons, and one dragon. Otherwise, it appears that "psychic" is the new "vampire" (ignoring the fact that our friend to the left is a psychic vampire to being with.)



Nonfiction: Most of the nonfiction deals were for memoirs (and several of those account for the adults moving to YA).




Historical: Nobody writes about the 70s. Hasn't anyone seen "Dazed and Confused"? "That 70s Show"?

These pictures are kind of random, except for Shakespeare, Poe, Houdini, Shelley, and Jack the Ripper.


"Retellings" fell all over the genre map.




And finally...

Only 3.5 celebrities got YA deals in this time period. (I'm counting one listing as a 1/2 because the blurb made him sound internet famous, but it was no one I'd ever heard of.) 

This is a good reminder to be wary of infographics: from looking at this chart, you might infer that being a celebrity makes getting a deal more difficult, or that celeb deals are tiny. However, none of them listed a price tag, which means you can probably use your imagination and/or logic to figure out the rest.

Check back next month when we'll be looking at covers, minority representation, and how many floating/dead/girls in ballgowns we can count. If you have suggestions for other publishing-related charts, please leave them in the comments, and thanks for reading!

Same disclaimers apply:

  1. I took "math for liberal arts major" in college...
  2. All figures were taken from Publisher's Marketplace deal reporting. I didn't download any statistics from their website- I counted the deals (not individual books) manually and assigned my own categories when necessary. Special thanks to Phoebe North and Kristin Halbrook for helping me categorize titles; a few errors are likely and are totally mine.
  3. These charts are not a full representation of YA publishing, because some agents and editors choose not to list deals in Publisher's Marketplace, nor have I included any foreign sales.
  4. Dystopian includes apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic. 
  5. These books sold in the past year, but your local bookstore shelves won't reflect these numbers until at least winter 2012, at the earliest. See Carrie Ryan's post for more information on YA deal time frames.

19 comments:

  1. GREAT series! How am I just now reading this? Anywho, gonna scoot on over and read the rest.

    EJ

    BTW, isn't Internet famous the new famous? The drugged up, post oral surgery kid is HUGE. And think about all those lol kitties. Bet they're pooping in high cotton--or gold dust filled litter boxes--now. : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not to mention those little girls dancing to Nikki Minaj. Why don't they have a book deal yet?

      Delete
  2. I've loved these graphs you've done the past few days. And it makes me happy to know that even though I see books by Hilary Duff, Snooki, and Lauren Conrad, it's not just celebrities that are getting book deals.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely. And keep in mind that the debut numbers are probably higher, too, since each agency writes announcements in different ways, and some don't mention debut.

      Delete
  3. so glad you did this again this year. i love your charts and can't imagine how much work goes into them. awesome series!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love, love, love this! There are either kinds of math besides "math for liberal arts major"? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's what I hear. I have a vague memory of people actually majoring in the stuff. *shudder* :)

      Delete
  5. This is such a great series. Thanks so much for taking the time to do it!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'll have to catch up on your other posts as well. I'm a little worried about the lack of midcentury historical YA since that's what I'm writing. I'm trying to find comparative works and it's difficult; many are middle grade set int he 1960s, not YA. And you're right, I can't think of a single example in my searching from the 1970s.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't worry, they're just waiting for yours! :) Maybe 70s will start showing up when fashion switches back from skinny jeans to bell bottoms again. *crosses fingers*

      Delete
  7. A Pandora re-telling! Cool! (Umm, which book is that?)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't remember the title, but it sounds so. cool. She opens an email attachment that lets loose all kinds of hell. Definitely one of those "why didn't I think of that?" blurbs!

      Delete
  8. Fantastic series of posts! I remember this from last year, and I'm so glad you keep doing it. It's kind of mind-boggling to see all those stats at once. :0) In the good way!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks so much for the information! Fascinating and helpful.

    ReplyDelete

Commenting is good karma. And it makes your hair shiny.

(My own karma is better on Twitter-- I read all of these, but if you have a question, you might try me there!)